Court Rejects Woman’s Claim That Insurer Forged Her Signature On UIM Waiver

Scott Turow couldn’t make up stuff this good. 

In Jackson v. Allstate (E.D. Penn. July 12, 2006), Elise Jackson sued her auto insurer for bad faith failure to pay uninsured motorist benefits.  The insurer’s defense?  Jackson had signed a waiver of coverage.  But Jackson testified in her deposition that she didn’t recognize or remember the signature, and also claimed not to recognize examples of her signature that were indisputably genuine.  She claimed Allstate forged the key signature.  The judge, in granting summary judgment to Allstate, said Jackson had to prove forgery by clear and convincing evidence, and that no reasonable juror could find in her favor because she offered no proof whatsoever.  Here’s a link to the case.  Hat tip: Learned Elbow at The Bad Faith Blawg.  (It’s a good thing blogging came along, people haven’t had this much fun thinking up fake names since the CB radio craze died out 20 years ago).

I also want to commend the judge, Anita Brody, (and her clerk?), for writing a concise, clear opinion.  I really liked the bullet points.  Other judges could learn from this writing style.

Comments Off on Court Rejects Woman’s Claim That Insurer Forged Her Signature On UIM Waiver

Filed under Bad Faith

Comments are closed.